CLOSE
FREE SHIPPING AND RETURNS IN MANY COUNTRIES ×

THOSE WHO DON'T JUMP

will never fly

SUIT DIVE

Not too far from a sleepy little village in Faro, Portugal, on a beautiful sunny February morning, the Grand Le Mar team set out to conduct a field experiment. The objective was to stress test the durability of the Corduroy Gallardo suit from Grand Le Mars latest suit collection, by jumping out from an airplane at a height of 15,000 feet to perform a parachuting. A durable suit of high-quality fabrics and pure craftsmanship should be able handle this sort of thing, no?

In stable, belly-to-earth position, terminal velocity is about 200 km/h (120 mph). Stable freefall head down position has a terminal speed of 240–290 km/h (around 150–180 mph). During a normal deployment, a skydiver will generally experience a few seconds of intense deceleration, in the realm of 3 to 4 g, while the parachute slows the descent from 190 km/h (120 mph) to approximately 28 km/h (17 mph). It’s safe to say that the setting and conditions of the experiment were challenging enough for our beloved white-coloured Corduroy Gallardo suit.

So what was the end result? In short: the Corduroy Gallardo scores one against gravity who scores zero. The suit was flawless once back home on earth's solid ground. On a different note, in December 2018, Irene O'Shea, a 102-year-old woman from Australia, reportedly became the oldest person ever to skydive. 

Big congratulations to both the Corduroy Gallardo suit and to Irene O'Shea for pulling off such stunts, and proving to the rest of the world that rules are meant to be broken, and limits meant to be pushed.

#suitdive
Loading...